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Van Driving Tips
You will find people treat you differently when you are driving a van, rather than a car.  It’s not always bad though...

Other vans (and lorries, etc) may expect you to let them into the flow of slow moving traffic - be prepared for it to happen.  This also means that other vans will probably let you join the flow of traffic.

When you overtake another van (or lorry) on a motorway or dual carriageway, and especially at night, you may find they flash their headlights - this is to let you know that you have overtaken them and, if you feel it is safe to do so, may pull back into your original lane.  You do have to be careful with this one.  If you feel confident to do so, long vehicles that overtake you may appreciate a flash to let them know that they have passed you.

You may find that a traffic-joiner or overtaker will then show their appreciation by giving you a flash of each indicator light, or a couple of flashes of their hazard warning lights.  Recovery lorries may give you a burst of their roof beacons.

Self-drive hire vans may not behave as other vans - due to them being driven by car drivers, who don’t know the ‘rules’.

It is not compulsory to drive with your elbow on the window ledge.

Nor is it compulsory to acknowledge attractive members of the other (/same) sex.

Reversing is an even more difficult operation in a van, with it’s restricted rearward vision.  However reversing into a parking space does have advantages 1) if it will remove the need to reverse into a large ‘busy’ space 2) reversing at the end of a journey, when the engine is warm causes less wear than doing it with a cold engine, and with lessened risk of stalling and 3) reversing so that the rear door is up against a barrier has increased security potential.    When reversing, always be on the look out for the small child, or bollard.


If you have anything you would like to add to this page, do let me know.